Keynote at ICEEFEST 2018 – Designing Services using DesOps for Industrial Revolution 4.0

 

Design as a practice is undergoing significant change within the product-service continuum. Seismic shits in the era of cognitive commuting that includes Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, IoT, IoE and 5G networks, means that we have to deal with increasing complexity as Industrial Revolution 4.0 disrupts every sector transforming all manner of products and services.  The growing and dominant role of Agile Development methodologies and the need to collaborate at speed, has precipitated the emergence of Design Operations (DesOps) as means to integrate service design and user experience design within the lean organisation using Agile Development.

Agile Development is an umbrella term for several iterative and incremental software development methodologies. The most popular agile methodologies include Extreme Programming (XP), Scrum, Crystal, Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM), Lean Development, and Feature-Driven Development (FDD) where the emphasis on building and releasing code, features and products. Alongside the emergence of Agile Development has been the adoption of Design Thinking and User Centred Design to design and develop products and services that are both usability and intuitive to use. 

Service Design is set of principles and practices of design that is being adopted by a wide range of sectors as way to deal with complexity when transforming organisations and their offerings. Service design has its origins in banking and financials services and it has now matured into an approach that enables teams to look at complex and interconnected ecosystems consisting of people, places, touchpoints, communications, interactions, processes and systems, and the challenges of transforming and delivering services that result in engaging user experiences to both customers and employees. 

Service design along with other design practices are becoming operationalised so that designers can fully integrated within multi-disciplinary teams using Agile Development methods. The operationalisation of design is referred to as Design Operations or DesignOps or DesOps, and it has emerged as a new paradigm in design practice and project management using a systemised set of design practices and activities to work alongside and dovetail with DevOps (Development Operations) and BizOps (Business Operations).

This paper will explore the principles and practices of DesOps in Service Design, in the design of products and services, and how design activities, processes and toolchains are operationalised to enable designers to integrate and work in a core team (Scrum Team or Tribe) using Agile Development methods. This paper will assert that DesOps requires a systemic change to the way design is used in the development of new products and services in a workflow that is highly collaborative, fast, and lean, to support agile transformation at speed.

Service Design using Design Operations (DesOps) can applied to the design of products and services to create innovative and breakthrough businesses that are capable of generating experience equity and service equity.  This paper explore that principles and practice of Service Design and DesOps and how it changing design practice. This presentation will show how DesOps can be applied to deliver impactful transformation, improve design capability and capacity while working at speed to significantly reduce the time to market of innovative and user-centric products and services.

The world’s businesses, organisations and public services are undergoing seismic changing in the way they operate and deliver value as they transform to become digital first organisations. They are undergoing radial transformation and a period of unprecedented technology change that demands agility, speed and new ways to work together.  As a result there is now a new and emergent field of Design Operations (DesignOps or DesOps) that is part of a new approach to design called Design 4.0. Design 4.0 is a way for organisations to design in Industry 4.0.

Opening Keynote Speaker at BelTech 2018

Digital design as a practice is undergoing change within the product-service continuum in the outcome economy. Seismic shifts in the era of cognitive commuting that includes AI, machine learning, IoT, IoE and born-in-the-cloud apps means that we have to deal with increasing complexity as the Industrial Revolution 4.0 disrupts every sector, transforming all manner of services and the products we use.

The increasingly dominant role of agile methodologies and the need to collaborate as we deliver outcomes at speed has precipitated the emergence of design operations (DesOps). DesOps is a way of systemising design practices and using a new and distinct set of approaches and activities to work alongside and dovetail with DevOps (development operations) and BizOps (business operations).

DesOps, in the design of products and services, is concerned with the operationalisation of service, UX and UI design practices where designers work in a core team (or tribe) to share research, apply data insights and then formulate and test hypothesis-driven design (HDD).

HDD is used to set goals based on a target state and deliver outcomes (rather than outputs) in an iterative and agile approach of ‘design, build, test and measure’. DesOps requires a systemic change to the way design is used in the development of new services in a workflow that is highly collaborative, fast and lean to support transformation at speed and with agility.

This presentation will look at the principles, practices and value of service design using DesOps and how this can applied to the design of products and services. It will explore how service design and DesOps as a philosophy and practice is changing the tools and activities used by designers within core teams using agile approaches.

I will draw upon examples from across a range of sectors and focus on project work undertaken within financial services. This session will show how DesOps can be applied to deliver impactful transformation, improve design capability and capacity while working at speed to significantly reduce the time to market of innovative and user-centric products and services.

About the Speaker

Peter Fossick is a seasoned design director specialising in service design, UX design and disruptive innovation using a range of approaches to deliver disruptive omni-channel and customer-centric experiences within the service-product continuum for the Outcome Economy.

Peter has worked across diverse sectors with top tier global corporations and start-ups in the USA, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, China and Australia.

His project and client experience includes: AMP, Schroders-Cazenove, GM, Fairfax Media, IBM, Lloyds Banking Group, The Saudi Ministry of Health, Standard Chartered Bank, WilliamHill Online and many more.

With a proven track record in successful boot-strapping and scaling start-ups at speed, Peter is an angel investor in several companies in the USA and UK. He has established Argo Investments to invest in start-ups.

As an academic, Peter has established the IXSD Academy and he developed the first BFA & MFA in service design in the USA, as well as groundbreaking undergraduate and postgraduate curricula in design thinking, HCD, product design, UX design and interaction design as well as in innovation and design management in the UK, USA and SE Asia.

 Peter_Fossick

UXIstanbul

I was thrilled to be invited to UXIstanbul and deliver a keynote on digital transformation using Service Design.

This presentation discussed new approaches in designing and innovating to deliver transformation that supports businesses working at speed as they drive to disruptive innovation in a range of sectors including Banking, Financial Services, Transport Utilities and Defence as we move swiftly into the era of cognitive computing and Industry 4.0

The presentation outlined and explained strategic, tactical and practical approaches to innovating at speed using Service Design and UX in an approach I’ve termed Design 4.0; a holistic design approach that utilizes a range of practices, processes and tool that help us collaborate radically within organisations to deliver digital transformation and disruption in the era of cognitive computing and Industry 4.0.

I discussed service design, agility and the emergent field of design operations (DesOps) and how they are part Design 4.0. in industry 4.0. Design 4.0 marries BizOps, DevOps and the emerging field of Design Operations (or DesOps) to support design in Industry 4.0 and importantly Design 4.0 features semi-autonomous and fully autonomous computer systems (machines) that assist in design. Design 4.0 as a term has been used in different ways to describe design that is focused on social innovation (GK Van Patter, 2009), but my definition extends its definition to align it with tasks and activities relating to design and in Industry 4.0.

Robotics, artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies can deliver huge benefits where  Government and industry co-operate and in Britain may be able to create 175,000 new manufacturing jobs and generate an extra £455bn if the UK takes full advantage of a “fourth industrial revolution” based on robotics, artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies. That’s the conclusion of a new Government-commissioned report by a group representing some of the UK’s top companies, led by Siemens UK and Ireland boss, Professor Juergen Maier.

Service, experience, interaction and visual design as a set of practices offer strategic and tactical approaches to designing products and services that are proving highly effective in a world that is undergoing a digital transformation. Coupled with Design Thinking and Human Centred Design they have utilised contextual and participatory work with users, actors and customers as part of a participatory design process to gather both qualitative and quantitative data undertaken in an iterative and phased process. Essentially they are analogue in nature and are both people and time intensive.

However, increasingly design is informed with data-derived insights using advancing data collection techniques and processed using increasingly ubiquitous machine learning and cognitive computing applications. A traditional phased design model or lean approach is not always fast enough or efficient in an agile world where bespoke services and user experiences can be configured in an instant to match a users preferences, behaviours and location and their unique circumstances.

Design 1.0 was paper and pen, using physical tools like a ruler featuring a human agent. Design 2.0 was computer assisted design (CAD) featuring applications driven by a human agent. Design 3.0 is assisted design using CAD apps where knowledge based systems learn from the human actor. Design 4.0 is fully autonomous or semi autonomous design that may or may not involved a human actor (a designer, developer or product owner).

For companies to compete in the Outcome Economy as a part of Industry 4.0 that features IoT, machine learning, autonomous systems and cognitive computing requires a new model that I have termed Design 4.0. Design 4.0 comprises of semi-autonomous agile approach that will increasingly feature machine intelligence and a data informed driven strategy that features data garnered using people-to-people, people-to-machine and machine-to-machine interactions. More on this in the coming weeks and months!

Traditional design models are failing…

As a Service Designer specialising in UX and Digital Design I have developed a number of frustrations with traditional customer-centric design methods that use a phased approached.

For the past couple of years I have been leading design teams in London, the UAE and recently in Sydney where I was involved in transformational and strategic design projects with a focus on delivering disruptive solutions for large corporations. Often I have found myself working with teams of very smart and talented people that were unable to deliver efficiently or deliver disruptive innovation.

Without a rigorous and sophisticated approach to design that incorporates HCD and DT that is lean and agile, businesses have no means of gaining and sustaining a competitive advantage by creating engaging customer experiences that are timely. Interestingly just 29% of companies surveyed by Forrester in a recent study, follow any formal design process – let alone an agile design process.

Having a customer centred design ethos is not enough. It’s about delivering meaningful experiences and innovative services that are loved by the user that are relevant, affordable, and usable. But importantly these services must be in the market place and ready to scale before incumbents or a start-up have even thought of doing what you have created. 

To achieve this companies need a design model that has the customer continually engaged in ‘conversations’. The organisation has to have the means to focus design based on listening, interpreting and responding in a proactive and anticipatory way. Service and experience design methods must be strategic and practical and based on contextual and participatory work with customers who are part of an established constituency and drawn from new constituencies. Co-design with users has to be undertaken in a continually iterative fast-paced process of discovery, definition, design, development, testing and adaption.

A few years ago I found that traditional double-diamond phased design models are no longer sustainable or efficient in an agile world.

I found that the momentum of design and development had become so complex and fast paced that the traditional skills and labour intensive processes that produced graphic assets were no longer relevant or sustainable. These beautiful but overly complex assets; experience maps, storyboards, wireframes and WOW diagrams, were no longer perceived as having a cache or currency because they were not delivering real value. They have, by enlarge, become irrelevant.

For companies to compete with agile innovation they will increasingly have to adopt a lean UX design model that works with constituencies. This will enable companies to strategically integrate design into their businesses, as well as their culture, behaviours, activities, and values.

A lean UX design process is based around agile methodologies and incorporates insight driven strategic design in an iterative design and innovation solution model that is called WAgile.

WAgile takes the best and most effective features of a phased Waterfall approach (based on a double diamond model) and Agile (based on work-streams and sprints) and features HCD at is core to drive insight based innovation that engages with customer’s and users in a co-design process.

To find out more about Lean UX, its methods and tools please email me. 

Peter Fossick: The Future of Service Design Education

In the latest issue of Touchpoint, Editor-in-Chief Jesse Grimes caught up with me to learn about the opportunities afforded to me as a service designer working within global giant IBM, and to hear my thoughts on where service design education should be heading. As the Service Design Program Director at IBM and the founder of the IXSD Academy in London, I have a background that includes developing ground-breaking curriculum in  design as well as over twenty years working with start-ups, SMEs, and corporations using service design and design thinking to deliver disruptive innovation.

“In the future designers will need to be polymorphs and trans-disciplinary, where they can adapt to a fast paced changing world. I would like to see a Polytechnic approach in higher education;  the University system in the UK is broken in parts and it’s failing its students”

I recently established the IXSD Academy to provide coaching, training and education that has a focus on collaborative and co-creative approaches to develop skills and thought leadership in design, innovation and transformation in the digital economy.

I have been at the forefront of shifting approaches to design education since working with Prof. Norman McNally at Glasgow School of Art in the early 1990s and over the decades I have been involved in developing innovative and ground breaking curriculum in design thinking and pioneering service education in the USA. Check out what I have to say in the SDN’s Touchpoint Vol 9 Edition 1 ‘Education and Capacity Building

 https://www.service-design-network.org/touchpoint/touchpoint-9-1-education-and-capacity-building/pete-fossick

TEDx Reset Talk – ‘Why Robots Need To Dream’

Recently I was invited to TEDx Reset and talked about ‘Why Robots Need to Dream’ – enjoy the video!

I am available as a guest speaker to give talks at conferences and events. I have an interest in talking on a range of subjects including service design, experience design, design thinking, innovation and transformation.

Please contact me here to discuss any speaking or lecturing engagements.

Plum now works with the Google Assistant at #Googleio2017

Plum now works with the Google Assistant at #Googleio2017

“Hey Google, dim my kitchen lights”

Plum is the world’s smartest light dimmer for the smart connected home. They are easy to install and use. Plum’s app enables the products to connect via WiFi to form a home network where each device can be controlled using the App on a smartphone.

Plum LightPads can now be controlled using Google Assistant – simply speak to Google Assistant and ask for lights to be dimmed or a scene to be set and you’re good to go!

Google has taken on Amazon Alexa, Apple Siri, and Microsoft Cortana with its own voice assistant: Google Assistant. Google first unveiled Assistant at Google I/O in May 2016, launched it on the Google Pixel and Pixel XL phones, brought it to Google Home, and then Android Wear 2.0, before starting the rollout to other phones running Android Nougat. While that list is limited for now, we’re expecting much wider availability to become a major focus for Google this year.

I am an early stage Angel Investor in Plum, while my consultancy; Factotum Design, worked with Glen and Utz, Plum’s founders, to get the first MVP off the ground at DEMO.  Plum has since gone from strength-to-strength and is about to close its second round of funding.

Service Design Network Ireland Launches

We held the launch of the the Service Design Network National Chapter last night in Dublin, Ireland. With attendees from all over Ireland and from a diverse range of sectors, it was a huge success, with a full house at the Bank of Ireland, Trinity College and 90 people on the reserve list! Worry not we’ll be holding another event next month and there will be some new members of SDN talking about their experience designing services for the outcome economy. If you would like to join and get more details contact us here https://www.service-design-network.org/chapters/sdn-ireland-building

The Service Design Network (SDN) is the world’s leading platform to connect with like-minded passionate service designers from companies, agencies and universities, and with curious innovators who embrace and apply this approach for the better of their organisations and for people.

Last night I spoke about Service Design ‘Doing’ by drawing on examples of twenty years of designing services and highlighting some case studies form the past three years. The focus of my talk was to how design innovative services rapidly using lean and agile practices by applying combination of service thinking tools in ‘Playbooks’.

I shared the stage with Diego Dalia and Tim McCarthur co-organisers of Service Design Network, Ireland both of whom work with me at IBM in Dublin.

The main purpose of SDN is to build awareness and “hunger” for service design in the public and private service sector and in the world of politics.

The Service Design Network is bringing the 10th Service Design Global Conference to Madrid  in La N@ve for buzzing and vibrant days with inspiring talks and intense breakout sessions on 2nd and 3rd of November 2017.

If you want information about joining SDN please use this link  and if you want to get general information about the SDN please use this link

Plum featured in Smart Home Tech

IOT Smart Tech Home

Plum  – a start-up in which I was an early angel investor has been mentioned in the media.

Smart Home Tech The smart home market could grow from $46.97 Billion in 2015, to $121.73 Billion by 2022. VCs participated in nearly 40 equity deals to over 20 companies since 2011. Startups include: Appliances — SectorQube, Inc. Device controllers — Nest & Philips Energy and unilities — ecobee & Plum Smart home solutions — Vivint Smart Home Health and wellness — MedMinder Systems & Beddit Home robots — Jibo, & Neato Security — SimpliSafe & Canary CB Insights smart home… https://lnkd.in/bGJ7ydw

Service Design in Venture-as-a-Service

Service Design (SERVD) is the application of range of established and new design tools that are used to identify, define and optimise systems, touchpoints, people’s roles and the ecologies that deliver innovative services.

The Services Sector

In the UK, there has been a massive shift in economic power from manufacturing to services in the past five decades. In 1948, British industry (including manufacturing, oil & gas extraction, and utilities) accounted for 41% of the British economy but by 2013, it was just 14%. At the same time the service sector’s share of the economy has risen from 46% to 79%. (Source: The Guardian ).

Compare the UK’s GDP from services to Europe’s where it is 72%, China has 45%, the USA 71% and worldwide it is 65%. (Source: The Economist)

 Service Design in a Venture-as-a-Model

Increasingly Service Design is being offered by business and transformation consultancies. In the past year 18 months, a number of the world’s leading consultancies have bought creative agencies and now offer Service and UX design as part of a transformation offering. For example, Accenture bought Fjord, Ernst & Young bought Seren, Kinsey bought Lunar and Boston Consulting Group bought S&C to establish BCG Digtial Ventures.

Service Thinking (Ben Reason et al) places people, networks and experiences at the core of how service designers innovate with business stakeholders and technology groups to create new and engaging services. Design Thinking works well when it is used in conjunction with Blue Ocean Strategies in the creation of new ventures. It is noteworthy that Service Design (along with experience design and strategic design) are core offerings in the major transformation groups as they shift from a service-as-a-fee model to venture-as-a-service.

 Service Design is a process of design that is customer-centric and systems orientated that is distinct from user experience design and interaction design but part of a triptych for designing in the experience economy.

Service_design4.fw

As Service Design is a relatively new discipline in design, it is misunderstood and underused by many of companies while services are often poorly planned, badly designed and inefficiently implemented. There is a huge gap between the customer’s and user’s experience of engaging with a service and the organisations.

80% of companies think they offer a superior service, yet only 8% of their customers agree. (Design Council)

Although service design is growing rapidly and is increasingly recognised as an enabler of system and transformational change it lacks visibility.

I was an early adopter of service design, having recognised in the 1990s that an advanced product’s functionality and support systems were both embedded and increasingly distributed and connected through the Internet.

Organisations needed innovation that meant taking a more holistic approach that was concerned with touchpoints (products and apps), environments (retail or civic), systems (networks, eCommerce, etc.) and the organisation (people and culture).

Service Thinking emerged from Design Thinking (Kelly et al) as a way to identify and solve problems systemically in organisations. Livework’s founders Ben Reason, Chris Downs and Lars Löveren worked with IDEO before launching the first Service Design agency in London 2001.

Where to use Service Design

According to the Design Council (UK), Service Design adds significant value when applied in the one or more of the following circumstances:

1. Service design as a methodology with tools to deliver optimised offerings and experiences.

2. Service design as a people-centred process to address specific operational and organisational needs.

3. Service design as a collaborative process that requires a co-design and people focused approach.

4. Service design as a methodology optimise complex systems and interconnected ecologies to create disruptive innovation.


Service Design Tools

As a service designer there are a range of tools that I can utilise, here are a few and for a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in peterfossic.co

ACTOR MAP

An actors map is a diagram representing the relationship of  people and stakeholder called ‘actors’ in a service ecology. It provides a systemic view of a service.  The diagram is built by identifying the actors, touchpoints and high level view of the service. The diagram is built from a specific actor and will feature other actors and touchpoints that are connected to and can influence or interact wth the actor via the service.

BLUEPRINT (SERVICE)

The service blueprint is a tool that describes the operational nature and the characteristics of the system, the actors, context, touchpoints and the interaction model that support and form the service. It is based on flows through the system and uses a standardised graphical technique that displays the process functions above and below the line of visibility from the customers viewpoint, where all the touchpoints and the back-stage processes are documented and aligned to the user experience.

EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPING

This tool involves creating objects or ‘props’ and acting out the interaction model (see above) to explore the way a proposed service concept will work. This approach is also referred to as ‘evidencing’ or ‘body storming’, where the use of models and objects representing touchpoints are to enable designers to take ideas and interact together to assess their usefulness. This process is highly iterative and use ‘rough & ready prototyping’ techniques.

For a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in peterfossic.co