Peter Fossick: The Future of Service Design Education

In the latest issue of Touchpoint, Editor-in-Chief Jesse Grimes caught up with me to learn about the opportunities afforded to me as a service designer working within global giant IBM, and to hear my thoughts on where service design education should be heading. As the Service Design Program Director at IBM and the founder of the IXSD Academy in London, I have a background that includes developing ground-breaking curriculum in  design as well as over twenty years working with start-ups, SMEs, and corporations using service design and design thinking to deliver disruptive innovation.

“In the future designers will need to be polymorphs and trans-disciplinary, where they can adapt to a fast paced changing world. I would like to see a Polytechnic approach in higher education;  the University system in the UK is broken in parts and it’s failing its students”

I recently established the IXSD Academy to provide coaching, training and education that has a focus on collaborative and co-creative approaches to develop skills and thought leadership in design, innovation and transformation in the digital economy.

I have been at the forefront of shifting approaches to design education since working with Prof. Norman McNally at Glasgow School of Art in the early 1990s and over the decades I have been involved in developing innovative and ground breaking curriculum in design thinking and pioneering service education in the USA. Check out what I have to say in the SDN’s Touchpoint Vol 9 Edition 1 ‘Education and Capacity Building

 https://www.service-design-network.org/touchpoint/touchpoint-9-1-education-and-capacity-building/pete-fossick

The Many Different Flavours of Design Thinking

IBM Design Thinking Practice Books

Design Thinking has been around for a while and many design groups, consultancies and organisations have developed their own ‘flavour’ of design thinking to meet their particular design needs. It’s interesting to see how this design thinking as a methodology and practice has evolved and been honed to be adapted to different contexts.

If you wish to discuss design thinking and how your business might benefit please connect with me using the contact page. I’m happy to have a no obligation chat. Enjoy!

As a Design Practice Manager in IBM I have adopted IBM Design Thinking. IBM designers work within a global community of 400K people at the cutting edge of design, technology and service innovation and IBM Design in Austin has invested in developing a unique approach to design thinking that is used not only by its 1,300 designers but also by its engineers, developers and throughout the whole organisation.

IBM Design Thinking has been developed to enable disparate professionals and experts to focus on developing user-centric experiences and innovative digital solutions by working collaboratively with each other and with IBM’s clients. IBM Design Thinking is effective because its accessible, easy to adopt and flexible.

At the heart of IBM’s human-centred mission is the IBM Design Thinking framework. It’s a means to solve users’ problems at the speed and scale of the modern digital enterprise. IBM Design Thinking has its roots in traditional design thinking and more recently I have been working with a group of designer to extend IBM’s design practices to include and embrace Service Design.

Whether we’re re-envisioning the customer experience for a multinational bank, or just planning a product’s next release, IBM Design Thinking helps us focus on what matters to our clients and, importantly, their customers.

If you’re interested in the different approaches to design thinking then check out these links and explore the different ways groups and people have adapted design thinking and applied it in their businesses.

 


Harvard Business Review:
Design Thinking and Innovation At Apple
A Harvard business case: Winner of a 2013 ecch Case Award. It describes Apple’s approach to innovation, management, and design thinking

 


How design thinking transformed Airbnb from failing startup to billion-dollar business
A fireside chat between Joe Gebbia of Airbnb and Phin Barnes of First Round Capital. Filmed at Design+Startup at IDEO San Francisco on March 14, 2013.

 


How It Works: Design Thinking
Trying to solve a problem or find better ways of getting work done? Get familiar with IBM Design Thinking and Agile. For more information on IBM Design Thinking, please visit: http://www.ibm.com/design

 


A New Approach to Design Thinking
In 2013, IBM, one of the world’s largest technology companies, set the mission to create a sustainable culture of design.

Links to online resources:
LUMA empowers people to innovate everywhere, by transforming the way they work.

IDEO HCD – How It Works

IDEO Design Thinking – Methods

IBM Design Thinking – with resources and methods practice guide

If you wish to discuss design thinking and how your business might benefit please connect with me using the contact page. I’m happy to have a no obligation chat. Enjoy!

TEDx Reset Talk – ‘Why Robots Need To Dream’

Recently I was invited to TEDx Reset and talked about ‘Why Robots Need to Dream’ – enjoy the video!

I am available as a guest speaker to give talks at conferences and events. I have an interest in talking on a range of subjects including service design, experience design, design thinking, innovation and transformation.

Please contact me here to discuss any speaking or lecturing engagements.

Service Design Playbooks

IBM Methods Cards Service Design

In an ever more complex world, with seismic shifts in the way we work and live, there is increasing demand for new approaches to the way design as we transform business and industry. Developments in previously disjointed fields such as artificial intelligence, big data, cognitive computing, the internet, IoT and mobile are all conflating and amplifying one another.

Furthermore, we are all aware that over the past four decades we have shifted from economies of scale with mass markets where we manufactured tangible products, to delivering intangible services in long-tail markets using advanced information technologies on the world-wide-web.

As a Practice Manager and the Service Design Program Director at IBM in Dublin, I work in the Global Technology Services Group where we are developing and evolving our approaches to the way we work together with our clients to define the future.

At IBM, Global Technology Services (GTS) we work with clients from all over Europe to design and develop a wide range of technology services that run the foundational systems the world relies on. These are the platforms that enable the backbone of the world’s economy in Banking, Telecoms, Retail, Airlines, Government and Insurance to operate. The challenges we face individually, in our business and in that of our clients, are complex.

Service Design in Enterprise

At IBM I work Tim Macarthur and Diego Dalia and together we work within a larger global community 400K people who at the cutting edge of technology and service innovation. Over the past six months Tim Macarthur, Diego Dalia and I have been developing a Service Design Playbook that we can use with our teams at the cutting edge of technology and service innovation.

At IBM, we take design very seriously and as a technology company it has always valued design. From the early days of personal computers to the first mainframe computers to the most recent work in cognitive computing, design is crucial.

IBM has invested in developing a unique approach to design thinking that is used not only by its 1500 designers but also by its engineers, developers and throughout the whole organisation. IBM Design Thinking has been developed to enable disparate professionals and experts to focus on developing user-centric experiences and innovative digital solutions by working collaboratively with each other and with clients. IBM Design Thinking’s framework is a means to solve users’ problems at the speed and scale of the modern digital enterprise.

Designing Services

IBM Design Thinking has its roots in traditional design thinking but more recently I have been working with a group of designers to augment IBM’s design thinking to include and embrace Service Design. Whether we’re re-envisioning a customer experience for a multinational bank or exploring ways to beat cancer, or helping government deliver better services, service design helps my teams focus on what matters to our clients and importantly their end-users.

Service in the Outcome Economy

At IBM, success is not measured by the features and functions but rather by outcomes. Whether we’re helping clients discover a cure for cancer, collaborate across the globe, or deliver financial services, our clients rely on us to deliver outcomes. We are shifting the conversation from one about features and functions to one about users and outcomes. In so doing we deliver more useful, usable, and desirable services.

Service Design Thinking helps us pivot away from designing products to designing outcomes, from the tangible to the intangible. It has become an important means to deliver value while working with our clients on very complex and entangled eco-systems.

The value of Service Design in the Digital Enterprise

Working in IBM means you work with very smart people. The smartest I have ever encountered. I was recently in a workshop that featured technical experts with numerous patents for technologies like Blockchain and Cognitive Computing. To give you a measure; IBM filed 8033 patents last year.

Typically, we work in ‘core’ teams to examine problems holistically rather than reductively to understand relationships in complex eco-systems. This means our designers, technologist and business experts can work together to frame challenges by working with users and with SMEs to align around domains that create value. I find that that using service design thinking helps our teams with a strong technology focus connect with designers because the tools service designers use is similar and in some cases adapted from areas like systems and IT design. Developers and technology experts enjoy collaborating using the service design approaches we use in workshops and within sprints throughout a project.

We define insights based on user research to identify opportunities and then we ideate in our teams to then move quickly to prototyping so we can resonance test with end-users the systems and processes that support new offerings in a service-product continuum. Importantly we do not only design interactions and experiences; we also define the processes and eco-systems. This means we increasingly look at new organisational structures with new roles and that need people with skills that are at the cutting edge of technology. When we design with new technologies, we are also helping to define new industries and new markets. It’s very exciting.

Service Design Playbooks

Working with Diego Dalia and Tim Macarthur we have developed a Service Design Playbook and practice guide to help design and collaborate with our colleagues. The Service Design Playbook contains methods and activities for teams to use in implementing radical collaboration that put the client and their users at the centre of our thinking.

Each Service Design method can be used in combination as part of a broader set of activities in a Playbook. Our Service Design Playbook enables us take typical and atypical situations and develop a unique approach by using different combinations of service design methods and activities suited to the project or a sprint within the project.

Our Service Design Playbook breaks down into three distinct flavours of Observe, Reflect and Make so we are aligned with IBM Design Thinking’s Framework. Importantly, Service Design at IBM is part of a larger ‘Playbook’ of IBM Design Thinking.

When We Use Service Design

Service Design adds significant value when applied in the one or more of the following circumstances:

Service design as a methodology with activities and tools combined in playbooks that deliver optimised service offerings and experiences.

Service design as a people-centred process to address operational and organizational needs as part of a transformation process or in a new venture.

Service design as a collaborative and participatory process that requires a co-design approach.

Service design as a process to optimize complex systems and interconnected ecologies.

This article was first published in Medium in May 2017

Plum now works with the Google Assistant at #Googleio2017

Plum now works with the Google Assistant at #Googleio2017

“Hey Google, dim my kitchen lights”

Plum is the world’s smartest light dimmer for the smart connected home. They are easy to install and use. Plum’s app enables the products to connect via WiFi to form a home network where each device can be controlled using the App on a smartphone.

Plum LightPads can now be controlled using Google Assistant – simply speak to Google Assistant and ask for lights to be dimmed or a scene to be set and you’re good to go!

Google has taken on Amazon Alexa, Apple Siri, and Microsoft Cortana with its own voice assistant: Google Assistant. Google first unveiled Assistant at Google I/O in May 2016, launched it on the Google Pixel and Pixel XL phones, brought it to Google Home, and then Android Wear 2.0, before starting the rollout to other phones running Android Nougat. While that list is limited for now, we’re expecting much wider availability to become a major focus for Google this year.

I am an early stage Angel Investor in Plum, while my consultancy; Factotum Design, worked with Glen and Utz, Plum’s founders, to get the first MVP off the ground at DEMO.  Plum has since gone from strength-to-strength and is about to close its second round of funding.

Service Design Network Ireland Launches

We held the launch of the the Service Design Network National Chapter last night in Dublin, Ireland. With attendees from all over Ireland and from a diverse range of sectors, it was a huge success, with a full house at the Bank of Ireland, Trinity College and 90 people on the reserve list! Worry not we’ll be holding another event next month and there will be some new members of SDN talking about their experience designing services for the outcome economy. If you would like to join and get more details contact us here https://www.service-design-network.org/chapters/sdn-ireland-building

The Service Design Network (SDN) is the world’s leading platform to connect with like-minded passionate service designers from companies, agencies and universities, and with curious innovators who embrace and apply this approach for the better of their organisations and for people.

Last night I spoke about Service Design ‘Doing’ by drawing on examples of twenty years of designing services and highlighting some case studies form the past three years. The focus of my talk was to how design innovative services rapidly using lean and agile practices by applying combination of service thinking tools in ‘Playbooks’.

I shared the stage with Diego Dalia and Tim McCarthur co-organisers of Service Design Network, Ireland both of whom work with me at IBM in Dublin.

The main purpose of SDN is to build awareness and “hunger” for service design in the public and private service sector and in the world of politics.

The Service Design Network is bringing the 10th Service Design Global Conference to Madrid  in La N@ve for buzzing and vibrant days with inspiring talks and intense breakout sessions on 2nd and 3rd of November 2017.

If you want information about joining SDN please use this link  and if you want to get general information about the SDN please use this link

Service Design Network Ireland Launches

We held the launch of the the Service Design Network National Chapter last night in Dublin, Ireland. With attendees from all over Ireland and from a diverse range of sectors, it was a huge success, with a full house at the Bank of Ireland, Trinity College and 90 people on the reserve list! Worry not we’ll be holding another event next month and there will be some new members of SDN talking about their experience designing services for the outcome economy. If you would like to join and get more details contact us here https://www.service-design-network.org/chapters/sdn-ireland-building

The Service Design Network (SDN) is the world’s leading platform to connect with like-minded passionate service designers from companies, agencies and universities, and with curious innovators who embrace and apply this approach for the better of their organisations and for people.

Last night I spoke about Service Design ‘Doing’ by drawing on examples of twenty years of designing services and highlighting some case studies form the past three years. The focus of my talk was to how design innovative services rapidly using lean and agile practices by applying combination of service thinking tools in ‘Playbooks’.

I shared the stage with Diego Dalia and Tim McCarthur co-organisers of Service Design Network, Ireland both of whom work with me at IBM in Dublin.

The main purpose of SDN is to build awareness and “hunger” for service design in the public and private service sector and in the world of politics.

The Service Design Network is bringing the 10th Service Design Global Conference to Madrid  in La N@ve for buzzing and vibrant days with inspiring talks and intense breakout sessions on 2nd and 3rd of November 2017.

If you want information about joining SDN please use this link  and if you want to get general information about the SDN please use this link

 

 

Plum featured in Smart Home Tech

IOT Smart Tech Home

Plum  – a start-up in which I was an early angel investor has been mentioned in the media.

Smart Home Tech The smart home market could grow from $46.97 Billion in 2015, to $121.73 Billion by 2022. VCs participated in nearly 40 equity deals to over 20 companies since 2011. Startups include: Appliances — SectorQube, Inc. Device controllers — Nest & Philips Energy and unilities — ecobee & Plum Smart home solutions — Vivint Smart Home Health and wellness — MedMinder Systems & Beddit Home robots — Jibo, & Neato Security — SimpliSafe & Canary CB Insights smart home… https://lnkd.in/bGJ7ydw

Service Design in Venture-as-a-Service

Service Design (SERVD) is the application of range of established and new design tools that are used to identify, define and optimise systems, touchpoints, people’s roles and the ecologies that deliver innovative services.

The Services Sector

In the UK, there has been a massive shift in economic power from manufacturing to services in the past five decades. In 1948, British industry (including manufacturing, oil & gas extraction, and utilities) accounted for 41% of the British economy but by 2013, it was just 14%. At the same time the service sector’s share of the economy has risen from 46% to 79%. (Source: The Guardian ).

Compare the UK’s GDP from services to Europe’s where it is 72%, China has 45%, the USA 71% and worldwide it is 65%. (Source: The Economist)

 Service Design in a Venture-as-a-Model

Increasingly Service Design is being offered by business and transformation consultancies. In the past year 18 months, a number of the world’s leading consultancies have bought creative agencies and now offer Service and UX design as part of a transformation offering. For example, Accenture bought Fjord, Ernst & Young bought Seren, Kinsey bought Lunar and Boston Consulting Group bought S&C to establish BCG Digtial Ventures.

Service Thinking (Ben Reason et al) places people, networks and experiences at the core of how service designers innovate with business stakeholders and technology groups to create new and engaging services. Design Thinking works well when it is used in conjunction with Blue Ocean Strategies in the creation of new ventures. It is noteworthy that Service Design (along with experience design and strategic design) are core offerings in the major transformation groups as they shift from a service-as-a-fee model to venture-as-a-service.

 Service Design is a process of design that is customer-centric and systems orientated that is distinct from user experience design and interaction design but part of a triptych for designing in the experience economy.

Service_design4.fw

As Service Design is a relatively new discipline in design, it is misunderstood and underused by many of companies while services are often poorly planned, badly designed and inefficiently implemented. There is a huge gap between the customer’s and user’s experience of engaging with a service and the organisations.

80% of companies think they offer a superior service, yet only 8% of their customers agree. (Design Council)

Although service design is growing rapidly and is increasingly recognised as an enabler of system and transformational change it lacks visibility.

I was an early adopter of service design, having recognised in the 1990s that an advanced product’s functionality and support systems were both embedded and increasingly distributed and connected through the Internet.

Organisations needed innovation that meant taking a more holistic approach that was concerned with touchpoints (products and apps), environments (retail or civic), systems (networks, eCommerce, etc.) and the organisation (people and culture).

Service Thinking emerged from Design Thinking (Kelly et al) as a way to identify and solve problems systemically in organisations. Livework’s founders Ben Reason, Chris Downs and Lars Löveren worked with IDEO before launching the first Service Design agency in London 2001.

Where to use Service Design

According to the Design Council (UK), Service Design adds significant value when applied in the one or more of the following circumstances:

1. Service design as a methodology with tools to deliver optimised offerings and experiences.

2. Service design as a people-centred process to address specific operational and organisational needs.

3. Service design as a collaborative process that requires a co-design and people focused approach.

4. Service design as a methodology optimise complex systems and interconnected ecologies to create disruptive innovation.


Service Design Tools

As a service designer there are a range of tools that I can utilise, here are a few and for a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in peterfossic.co

ACTOR MAP

An actors map is a diagram representing the relationship of  people and stakeholder called ‘actors’ in a service ecology. It provides a systemic view of a service.  The diagram is built by identifying the actors, touchpoints and high level view of the service. The diagram is built from a specific actor and will feature other actors and touchpoints that are connected to and can influence or interact wth the actor via the service.

BLUEPRINT (SERVICE)

The service blueprint is a tool that describes the operational nature and the characteristics of the system, the actors, context, touchpoints and the interaction model that support and form the service. It is based on flows through the system and uses a standardised graphical technique that displays the process functions above and below the line of visibility from the customers viewpoint, where all the touchpoints and the back-stage processes are documented and aligned to the user experience.

EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPING

This tool involves creating objects or ‘props’ and acting out the interaction model (see above) to explore the way a proposed service concept will work. This approach is also referred to as ‘evidencing’ or ‘body storming’, where the use of models and objects representing touchpoints are to enable designers to take ideas and interact together to assess their usefulness. This process is highly iterative and use ‘rough & ready prototyping’ techniques.

For a more detailed list visit the ‘Tools’ section under ‘Services’ in peterfossic.co

Data, data everywhere…

Today we live and work in the experience economy, where “a company intentionally uses services as the stage, and goods as props, to engage individual customers in a way that creates a memorable event.” Harvard Business Review

To understand your customer and develop a relationship you need data- and lots of it. Data is driving the development of the personalised experience economy. But most companies only have 1% of their customer’s possible data. While some companies have a lot more for example, each day it is estimated that Facebook generates over  1 Petabyte of data.

The vast majority of data about people is held in many different locations and repositories on diverse platforms and form diverse data sets.

Combining this 1% with other datasets through data sharing can provide huge benefits and unprecedented insights into a customer’s wants, needs and behaviours.

Blending Data

Exchanging data can be difficult, entwined in legal issues and fraught with privacy issues! But now there is a start-up that has the solution.

Data Republic has built an efficient and secure platform for exchanging data that has an inbuilt trust framework and an API ecology that makes it the build and connection  process straight froward.

Personalisation is a mantra I’ve heard a lot from various boardrooms and executives over the last three years. It’s a strategy which centres around an old adage that ‘the customer is always right’; ‘give the customer what they want and they will beat a path to your door’, or even better, stay with you for life.

Paul McCarney – CEO, Data Republic

Data Republic is a business that is obsessed with data and meta-data and how to create personalised experiences for customers. Paul McCarney and his team have built a service using three principles:

  1. Privacy: Maintain the integrity of individual consumer’s  data and their ‘privacy relationship’ with companies
  2. Security: Data needs to be protected and feel secure, Clients that use Senate (the Data Republic platform) benefit from security and privacy by design.
  3. Governance: The companies clients (Republicans) have complete control over who has access to their data, how and when it can be accessed.

Data Republic have built a world leading data technology platform with a built in trust framework that will enable:

  • Companies to efficiently, safely and ethically exchange data to better serve their customers.
  • Data Analytics Partners to provide clients with higher fidelity insights that can be executed with confidence.
  • Consumers to be confident that their interests are being prioritised and that they have the ability to opt out if they choose.

Data Republic are start-up currently based in Stone & Chalk, a Fintech incubator based in Sydney. Visit their website here