Service Design Bootcamp in Dublin with DI

In this intense course you can learn a common understanding of service design and how it can be applied by teams to solve complex challenges in the design and development of innovative services. This workshop is an active and participatory introduction to the language, tools, practices and core principles of Service Design.

Why do this course

We teach the core concepts of service design, collaborative practices and 12 tried-and-tested tools/activities. We’ll teach you how to undertake work with stakeholders, undertake service safaris, identify painpoints in services and how systems and process can be optimised, mapped and then how to commnicate service concepts. This course will give you an introduction and basic working knowledge of how service design can be applied in your day-to-day job and in projects that demand teams unleash their expertise by working collaboratively to deal with service design challenges.

Keynote at ICEEFEST 2018 – Designing Services using DesOps for Industrial Revolution 4.0

 

Design as a practice is undergoing significant change within the product-service continuum. Seismic shits in the era of cognitive commuting that includes Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, IoT, IoE and 5G networks, means that we have to deal with increasing complexity as Industrial Revolution 4.0 disrupts every sector transforming all manner of products and services.  The growing and dominant role of Agile Development methodologies and the need to collaborate at speed, has precipitated the emergence of Design Operations (DesOps) as means to integrate service design and user experience design within the lean organisation using Agile Development.

Agile Development is an umbrella term for several iterative and incremental software development methodologies. The most popular agile methodologies include Extreme Programming (XP), Scrum, Crystal, Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM), Lean Development, and Feature-Driven Development (FDD) where the emphasis on building and releasing code, features and products. Alongside the emergence of Agile Development has been the adoption of Design Thinking and User Centred Design to design and develop products and services that are both usability and intuitive to use. 

Service Design is set of principles and practices of design that is being adopted by a wide range of sectors as way to deal with complexity when transforming organisations and their offerings. Service design has its origins in banking and financials services and it has now matured into an approach that enables teams to look at complex and interconnected ecosystems consisting of people, places, touchpoints, communications, interactions, processes and systems, and the challenges of transforming and delivering services that result in engaging user experiences to both customers and employees. 

Service design along with other design practices are becoming operationalised so that designers can fully integrated within multi-disciplinary teams using Agile Development methods. The operationalisation of design is referred to as Design Operations or DesignOps or DesOps, and it has emerged as a new paradigm in design practice and project management using a systemised set of design practices and activities to work alongside and dovetail with DevOps (Development Operations) and BizOps (Business Operations).

This paper will explore the principles and practices of DesOps in Service Design, in the design of products and services, and how design activities, processes and toolchains are operationalised to enable designers to integrate and work in a core team (Scrum Team or Tribe) using Agile Development methods. This paper will assert that DesOps requires a systemic change to the way design is used in the development of new products and services in a workflow that is highly collaborative, fast, and lean, to support agile transformation at speed.

Service Design using Design Operations (DesOps) can applied to the design of products and services to create innovative and breakthrough businesses that are capable of generating experience equity and service equity.  This paper explore that principles and practice of Service Design and DesOps and how it changing design practice. This presentation will show how DesOps can be applied to deliver impactful transformation, improve design capability and capacity while working at speed to significantly reduce the time to market of innovative and user-centric products and services.

The world’s businesses, organisations and public services are undergoing seismic changing in the way they operate and deliver value as they transform to become digital first organisations. They are undergoing radial transformation and a period of unprecedented technology change that demands agility, speed and new ways to work together.  As a result there is now a new and emergent field of Design Operations (DesignOps or DesOps) that is part of a new approach to design called Design 4.0. Design 4.0 is a way for organisations to design in Industry 4.0.

Opening Keynote Speaker at BelTech 2018

Digital design as a practice is undergoing change within the product-service continuum in the outcome economy. Seismic shifts in the era of cognitive commuting that includes AI, machine learning, IoT, IoE and born-in-the-cloud apps means that we have to deal with increasing complexity as the Industrial Revolution 4.0 disrupts every sector, transforming all manner of services and the products we use.

The increasingly dominant role of agile methodologies and the need to collaborate as we deliver outcomes at speed has precipitated the emergence of design operations (DesOps). DesOps is a way of systemising design practices and using a new and distinct set of approaches and activities to work alongside and dovetail with DevOps (development operations) and BizOps (business operations).

DesOps, in the design of products and services, is concerned with the operationalisation of service, UX and UI design practices where designers work in a core team (or tribe) to share research, apply data insights and then formulate and test hypothesis-driven design (HDD).

HDD is used to set goals based on a target state and deliver outcomes (rather than outputs) in an iterative and agile approach of ‘design, build, test and measure’. DesOps requires a systemic change to the way design is used in the development of new services in a workflow that is highly collaborative, fast and lean to support transformation at speed and with agility.

This presentation will look at the principles, practices and value of service design using DesOps and how this can applied to the design of products and services. It will explore how service design and DesOps as a philosophy and practice is changing the tools and activities used by designers within core teams using agile approaches.

I will draw upon examples from across a range of sectors and focus on project work undertaken within financial services. This session will show how DesOps can be applied to deliver impactful transformation, improve design capability and capacity while working at speed to significantly reduce the time to market of innovative and user-centric products and services.

About the Speaker

Peter Fossick is a seasoned design director specialising in service design, UX design and disruptive innovation using a range of approaches to deliver disruptive omni-channel and customer-centric experiences within the service-product continuum for the Outcome Economy.

Peter has worked across diverse sectors with top tier global corporations and start-ups in the USA, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa, China and Australia.

His project and client experience includes: AMP, Schroders-Cazenove, GM, Fairfax Media, IBM, Lloyds Banking Group, The Saudi Ministry of Health, Standard Chartered Bank, WilliamHill Online and many more.

With a proven track record in successful boot-strapping and scaling start-ups at speed, Peter is an angel investor in several companies in the USA and UK. He has established Argo Investments to invest in start-ups.

As an academic, Peter has established the IXSD Academy and he developed the first BFA & MFA in service design in the USA, as well as groundbreaking undergraduate and postgraduate curricula in design thinking, HCD, product design, UX design and interaction design as well as in innovation and design management in the UK, USA and SE Asia.

 Peter_Fossick

UXIstanbul

I was thrilled to be invited to UXIstanbul and deliver a keynote on digital transformation using Service Design.

This presentation discussed new approaches in designing and innovating to deliver transformation that supports businesses working at speed as they drive to disruptive innovation in a range of sectors including Banking, Financial Services, Transport Utilities and Defence as we move swiftly into the era of cognitive computing and Industry 4.0

The presentation outlined and explained strategic, tactical and practical approaches to innovating at speed using Service Design and UX in an approach I’ve termed Design 4.0; a holistic design approach that utilizes a range of practices, processes and tool that help us collaborate radically within organisations to deliver digital transformation and disruption in the era of cognitive computing and Industry 4.0.

I discussed service design, agility and the emergent field of design operations (DesOps) and how they are part Design 4.0. in industry 4.0. Design 4.0 marries BizOps, DevOps and the emerging field of Design Operations (or DesOps) to support design in Industry 4.0 and importantly Design 4.0 features semi-autonomous and fully autonomous computer systems (machines) that assist in design. Design 4.0 as a term has been used in different ways to describe design that is focused on social innovation (GK Van Patter, 2009), but my definition extends its definition to align it with tasks and activities relating to design and in Industry 4.0.

Robotics, artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies can deliver huge benefits where  Government and industry co-operate and in Britain may be able to create 175,000 new manufacturing jobs and generate an extra £455bn if the UK takes full advantage of a “fourth industrial revolution” based on robotics, artificial intelligence and other cutting-edge technologies. That’s the conclusion of a new Government-commissioned report by a group representing some of the UK’s top companies, led by Siemens UK and Ireland boss, Professor Juergen Maier.

Service, experience, interaction and visual design as a set of practices offer strategic and tactical approaches to designing products and services that are proving highly effective in a world that is undergoing a digital transformation. Coupled with Design Thinking and Human Centred Design they have utilised contextual and participatory work with users, actors and customers as part of a participatory design process to gather both qualitative and quantitative data undertaken in an iterative and phased process. Essentially they are analogue in nature and are both people and time intensive.

However, increasingly design is informed with data-derived insights using advancing data collection techniques and processed using increasingly ubiquitous machine learning and cognitive computing applications. A traditional phased design model or lean approach is not always fast enough or efficient in an agile world where bespoke services and user experiences can be configured in an instant to match a users preferences, behaviours and location and their unique circumstances.

Design 1.0 was paper and pen, using physical tools like a ruler featuring a human agent. Design 2.0 was computer assisted design (CAD) featuring applications driven by a human agent. Design 3.0 is assisted design using CAD apps where knowledge based systems learn from the human actor. Design 4.0 is fully autonomous or semi autonomous design that may or may not involved a human actor (a designer, developer or product owner).

For companies to compete in the Outcome Economy as a part of Industry 4.0 that features IoT, machine learning, autonomous systems and cognitive computing requires a new model that I have termed Design 4.0. Design 4.0 comprises of semi-autonomous agile approach that will increasingly feature machine intelligence and a data informed driven strategy that features data garnered using people-to-people, people-to-machine and machine-to-machine interactions. More on this in the coming weeks and months!

Traditional design models are failing…

As a Service Designer specialising in UX and Digital Design I have developed a number of frustrations with traditional customer-centric design methods that use a phased approached.

For the past couple of years I have been leading design teams in London, the UAE and recently in Sydney where I was involved in transformational and strategic design projects with a focus on delivering disruptive solutions for large corporations. Often I have found myself working with teams of very smart and talented people that were unable to deliver efficiently or deliver disruptive innovation.

Without a rigorous and sophisticated approach to design that incorporates HCD and DT that is lean and agile, businesses have no means of gaining and sustaining a competitive advantage by creating engaging customer experiences that are timely. Interestingly just 29% of companies surveyed by Forrester in a recent study, follow any formal design process – let alone an agile design process.

Having a customer centred design ethos is not enough. It’s about delivering meaningful experiences and innovative services that are loved by the user that are relevant, affordable, and usable. But importantly these services must be in the market place and ready to scale before incumbents or a start-up have even thought of doing what you have created. 

To achieve this companies need a design model that has the customer continually engaged in ‘conversations’. The organisation has to have the means to focus design based on listening, interpreting and responding in a proactive and anticipatory way. Service and experience design methods must be strategic and practical and based on contextual and participatory work with customers who are part of an established constituency and drawn from new constituencies. Co-design with users has to be undertaken in a continually iterative fast-paced process of discovery, definition, design, development, testing and adaption.

A few years ago I found that traditional double-diamond phased design models are no longer sustainable or efficient in an agile world.

I found that the momentum of design and development had become so complex and fast paced that the traditional skills and labour intensive processes that produced graphic assets were no longer relevant or sustainable. These beautiful but overly complex assets; experience maps, storyboards, wireframes and WOW diagrams, were no longer perceived as having a cache or currency because they were not delivering real value. They have, by enlarge, become irrelevant.

For companies to compete with agile innovation they will increasingly have to adopt a lean UX design model that works with constituencies. This will enable companies to strategically integrate design into their businesses, as well as their culture, behaviours, activities, and values.

A lean UX design process is based around agile methodologies and incorporates insight driven strategic design in an iterative design and innovation solution model that is called WAgile.

WAgile takes the best and most effective features of a phased Waterfall approach (based on a double diamond model) and Agile (based on work-streams and sprints) and features HCD at is core to drive insight based innovation that engages with customer’s and users in a co-design process.

To find out more about Lean UX, its methods and tools please email me. 

Service Design in the Era of Cognitive Computing

I recently had the privilege to speak at the Service Design Global Conference 2017 in Madrid.
While at IBM I worked with colleagues to evolve approaches to Service Design that shift our thinking and innovation activities away from products to ecosystems and outcomes.

This presentation explains the approaches, the strategy and practices we are using to design in the age of cognitive computing working with the world’s largest and most successful corporations.

IBM is applying Service Design methods and practices to help us deal with complex transformation challenges across large organisations to enable us to innovate at speed and scale with our clients.

Using an approach we call Service Design 4.0, IBM uses Playbooks, methods and practices that coalesce to help us radically collaborate within teams and with clients to deliver transformation within the disruptive paradigm of Industry 4.0.

See the video here https://youtu.be/T4w1tYKZ4No

Peter Fossick: The Future of Service Design Education

In the latest issue of Touchpoint, Editor-in-Chief Jesse Grimes caught up with me to learn about the opportunities afforded to me as a service designer working within global giant IBM, and to hear my thoughts on where service design education should be heading. As the Service Design Program Director at IBM and the founder of the IXSD Academy in London, I have a background that includes developing ground-breaking curriculum in  design as well as over twenty years working with start-ups, SMEs, and corporations using service design and design thinking to deliver disruptive innovation.

“In the future designers will need to be polymorphs and trans-disciplinary, where they can adapt to a fast paced changing world. I would like to see a Polytechnic approach in higher education;  the University system in the UK is broken in parts and it’s failing its students”

I recently established the IXSD Academy to provide coaching, training and education that has a focus on collaborative and co-creative approaches to develop skills and thought leadership in design, innovation and transformation in the digital economy.

I have been at the forefront of shifting approaches to design education since working with Prof. Norman McNally at Glasgow School of Art in the early 1990s and over the decades I have been involved in developing innovative and ground breaking curriculum in design thinking and pioneering service education in the USA. Check out what I have to say in the SDN’s Touchpoint Vol 9 Edition 1 ‘Education and Capacity Building

 https://www.service-design-network.org/touchpoint/touchpoint-9-1-education-and-capacity-building/pete-fossick

The Many Different Flavours of Design Thinking

IBM Design Thinking Practice Books

Design Thinking has been around for a while and many design groups, consultancies and organisations have developed their own ‘flavour’ of design thinking to meet their particular design needs. It’s interesting to see how this design thinking as a methodology and practice has evolved and been honed to be adapted to different contexts.

If you wish to discuss design thinking and how your business might benefit please connect with me using the contact page. I’m happy to have a no obligation chat. Enjoy!

As a Design Practice Manager in IBM I have adopted IBM Design Thinking. IBM designers work within a global community of 400K people at the cutting edge of design, technology and service innovation and IBM Design in Austin has invested in developing a unique approach to design thinking that is used not only by its 1,300 designers but also by its engineers, developers and throughout the whole organisation.

IBM Design Thinking has been developed to enable disparate professionals and experts to focus on developing user-centric experiences and innovative digital solutions by working collaboratively with each other and with IBM’s clients. IBM Design Thinking is effective because its accessible, easy to adopt and flexible.

At the heart of IBM’s human-centred mission is the IBM Design Thinking framework. It’s a means to solve users’ problems at the speed and scale of the modern digital enterprise. IBM Design Thinking has its roots in traditional design thinking and more recently I have been working with a group of designer to extend IBM’s design practices to include and embrace Service Design.

Whether we’re re-envisioning the customer experience for a multinational bank, or just planning a product’s next release, IBM Design Thinking helps us focus on what matters to our clients and, importantly, their customers.

If you’re interested in the different approaches to design thinking then check out these links and explore the different ways groups and people have adapted design thinking and applied it in their businesses.

 


Harvard Business Review:
Design Thinking and Innovation At Apple
A Harvard business case: Winner of a 2013 ecch Case Award. It describes Apple’s approach to innovation, management, and design thinking

 


How design thinking transformed Airbnb from failing startup to billion-dollar business
A fireside chat between Joe Gebbia of Airbnb and Phin Barnes of First Round Capital. Filmed at Design+Startup at IDEO San Francisco on March 14, 2013.

 


How It Works: Design Thinking
Trying to solve a problem or find better ways of getting work done? Get familiar with IBM Design Thinking and Agile. For more information on IBM Design Thinking, please visit: http://www.ibm.com/design

 


A New Approach to Design Thinking
In 2013, IBM, one of the world’s largest technology companies, set the mission to create a sustainable culture of design.

Links to online resources:
LUMA empowers people to innovate everywhere, by transforming the way they work.

IDEO HCD – How It Works

IDEO Design Thinking – Methods

IBM Design Thinking – with resources and methods practice guide

If you wish to discuss design thinking and how your business might benefit please connect with me using the contact page. I’m happy to have a no obligation chat. Enjoy!

TEDx Reset Talk – ‘Why Robots Need To Dream’

Recently I was invited to TEDx Reset and talked about ‘Why Robots Need to Dream’ – enjoy the video!

I am available as a guest speaker to give talks at conferences and events. I have an interest in talking on a range of subjects including service design, experience design, design thinking, innovation and transformation.

Please contact me here to discuss any speaking or lecturing engagements.

Service Design Playbooks

IBM Methods Cards Service Design

In an ever more complex world, with seismic shifts in the way we work and live, there is increasing demand for new approaches to the way design as we transform business and industry. Developments in previously disjointed fields such as artificial intelligence, big data, cognitive computing, the internet, IoT and mobile are all conflating and amplifying one another.

Furthermore, we are all aware that over the past four decades we have shifted from economies of scale with mass markets where we manufactured tangible products, to delivering intangible services in long-tail markets using advanced information technologies on the world-wide-web.

As a Practice Manager and the Service Design Program Director at IBM in Dublin, I work in the Global Technology Services Group where we are developing and evolving our approaches to the way we work together with our clients to define the future.

At IBM, Global Technology Services (GTS) we work with clients from all over Europe to design and develop a wide range of technology services that run the foundational systems the world relies on. These are the platforms that enable the backbone of the world’s economy in Banking, Telecoms, Retail, Airlines, Government and Insurance to operate. The challenges we face individually, in our business and in that of our clients, are complex.

Service Design in Enterprise

At IBM I work Tim Macarthur and Diego Dalia and together we work within a larger global community 400K people who at the cutting edge of technology and service innovation. Over the past six months Tim Macarthur, Diego Dalia and I have been developing a Service Design Playbook that we can use with our teams at the cutting edge of technology and service innovation.

At IBM, we take design very seriously and as a technology company it has always valued design. From the early days of personal computers to the first mainframe computers to the most recent work in cognitive computing, design is crucial.

IBM has invested in developing a unique approach to design thinking that is used not only by its 1500 designers but also by its engineers, developers and throughout the whole organisation. IBM Design Thinking has been developed to enable disparate professionals and experts to focus on developing user-centric experiences and innovative digital solutions by working collaboratively with each other and with clients. IBM Design Thinking’s framework is a means to solve users’ problems at the speed and scale of the modern digital enterprise.

Designing Services

IBM Design Thinking has its roots in traditional design thinking but more recently I have been working with a group of designers to augment IBM’s design thinking to include and embrace Service Design. Whether we’re re-envisioning a customer experience for a multinational bank or exploring ways to beat cancer, or helping government deliver better services, service design helps my teams focus on what matters to our clients and importantly their end-users.

Service in the Outcome Economy

At IBM, success is not measured by the features and functions but rather by outcomes. Whether we’re helping clients discover a cure for cancer, collaborate across the globe, or deliver financial services, our clients rely on us to deliver outcomes. We are shifting the conversation from one about features and functions to one about users and outcomes. In so doing we deliver more useful, usable, and desirable services.

Service Design Thinking helps us pivot away from designing products to designing outcomes, from the tangible to the intangible. It has become an important means to deliver value while working with our clients on very complex and entangled eco-systems.

The value of Service Design in the Digital Enterprise

Working in IBM means you work with very smart people. The smartest I have ever encountered. I was recently in a workshop that featured technical experts with numerous patents for technologies like Blockchain and Cognitive Computing. To give you a measure; IBM filed 8033 patents last year.

Typically, we work in ‘core’ teams to examine problems holistically rather than reductively to understand relationships in complex eco-systems. This means our designers, technologist and business experts can work together to frame challenges by working with users and with SMEs to align around domains that create value. I find that that using service design thinking helps our teams with a strong technology focus connect with designers because the tools service designers use is similar and in some cases adapted from areas like systems and IT design. Developers and technology experts enjoy collaborating using the service design approaches we use in workshops and within sprints throughout a project.

We define insights based on user research to identify opportunities and then we ideate in our teams to then move quickly to prototyping so we can resonance test with end-users the systems and processes that support new offerings in a service-product continuum. Importantly we do not only design interactions and experiences; we also define the processes and eco-systems. This means we increasingly look at new organisational structures with new roles and that need people with skills that are at the cutting edge of technology. When we design with new technologies, we are also helping to define new industries and new markets. It’s very exciting.

Service Design Playbooks

Working with Diego Dalia and Tim Macarthur we have developed a Service Design Playbook and practice guide to help design and collaborate with our colleagues. The Service Design Playbook contains methods and activities for teams to use in implementing radical collaboration that put the client and their users at the centre of our thinking.

Each Service Design method can be used in combination as part of a broader set of activities in a Playbook. Our Service Design Playbook enables us take typical and atypical situations and develop a unique approach by using different combinations of service design methods and activities suited to the project or a sprint within the project.

Our Service Design Playbook breaks down into three distinct flavours of Observe, Reflect and Make so we are aligned with IBM Design Thinking’s Framework. Importantly, Service Design at IBM is part of a larger ‘Playbook’ of IBM Design Thinking.

When We Use Service Design

Service Design adds significant value when applied in the one or more of the following circumstances:

Service design as a methodology with activities and tools combined in playbooks that deliver optimised service offerings and experiences.

Service design as a people-centred process to address operational and organizational needs as part of a transformation process or in a new venture.

Service design as a collaborative and participatory process that requires a co-design approach.

Service design as a process to optimize complex systems and interconnected ecologies.

This article was first published in Medium in May 2017